Mátyás Fountain renovated and unveiled
Posted by Mia Balogh · Sep 9, 2020

Beautiful fountain located in Buda Castle, also called the ‘Hungarian Trevi’ regained its splendour thanks to a recent complete renovation.

We are sure that you already know: Buda Castle is an amazing place with a lot of super selfie spots in there. Now it is even more attractive, with Mátyás Fountain, named after the Hungarian King Mátyás, and the statues around it having been renovated recently.

And it was unveiled to the public a few days ago by the grandson of the well-known creator of the fountain, sculptor Alajos Stróbl. The grandson, who is also called Mátyás just like the famous king, also took part in the nine-month reconstruction of this landmark. He said that it is a great feeling to see its rebirth.

The fountain, often referred to as the ‘Hungarian Trevi’ is much more than a beautiful detail in the Castle District: it has a history. It survived two world wars but suffered severe damage during the second one.

It had only been partially reconstructed, but in 2020 it not only received a refurbishment but was also cleaned with a special process and got a new lighting.

If you take a walk in the Castle District, we highly recommend you to visit this landmark – and try to arrive by sunset so you can see how wonderful colours illuminate the carving of the king and his entourage on a hunting expedition.

Source: Origo.hu , WeLoveBudapest.com

  • Mátyás fountain
  • renovated
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